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The lost art of real cooking: Physical Description xx, p. Language English View all editions Prev Next edition 2 of 2. Check copyright status Cite this Title The lost art of real cooking: Rosanna Nafziger grew up on a mountain in West Virginia. Inspired by Your Browsing History. Adeena Sussman and Chrissy Teigen. Staub and Amanda Frederickson.

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Editors of Martha Stewart Living. Air Fry Every Day. Canning in the Modern Kitchen. Eat at Home Tonight. Leslie Jonath and 18 Reasons. American Heart Association Instant and Healthy. Leda Scheintaub and Nash Patel. And a Bottle of Rum, Revised and Updated. If the authors were not so genuinely funny on occasion, or poignant when they discussed the eating disorders that resulted from the faulty preparation of corn, this book would not be nearly so enjoyable to read.

Jan 05, Evelyn rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: I know some people love reading cookbooks. I am not usually one of them, but this one I read beginning to end. I may have skimmed the bits about making sausage. It's not a recipe sort of book; it's only precise where it really needs to be. Otherwise, it's "a handful of this, a handful of that. If you love to cook, want to love to cook, are interested in traditional foods, or just like to read about food, this comes highly recommended.

The Lost Art of Real Cooking: Rediscovering the Pleasures of Traditional Food One Recipe at a Time

If the only cookbooks you are comfortable with have specific ingredients lists in specific quantities followed by specific cooking methods, read this anyway to expand your horizons a little bit. This cookbook has no hurry in it at all; its main concession to speed is describing how to make a cheese in a few weeks rather than a year. Rosanna Nafziger Henderson Ken Albala Jan 06, Kristin rated it really liked it Shelves: I don't usually count cookbooks in my reading tally even though I quite enjoy reading them.

However, this book is written entirely in prose, so it felt just like reading a book. There are recipes in the book; they are all just written in prose, generally with very loose measurements.

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The book is more about techniques that specific recipes. The writing style was reminiscent of Jeff Smith's a. The Frugal Gourmet --more so in Ken Albala's sections--and there was definitely an emphasis on just t I don't usually count cookbooks in my reading tally even though I quite enjoy reading them. The Frugal Gourmet --more so in Ken Albala's sections--and there was definitely an emphasis on just trying things without worrying about following tedious procedures.

I particularly liked the chapters on fermenting veggies and bread. I'm almost feeling brave enough to attempt my own sourdough starter. I borrowed this book from my local library, but I think I'm going to need to have my own copy for my cookbook shelf. Jan 07, Elizabeth Leonard rated it liked it.

Very interesting, but not as Sep 11, Dameon Manuel rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is the best cookbook you will ever own. And yes, I'm including 'Joy of Cooking' in that estimate. Mixed views on this: I enjoyed the fact that this was about doing things the good old-fashioned way, but on the other hand, many of the recipes are a little too vague and touchy-feely.

Maybe if I actually try making any of them, I'll find that they aren't as vague as they seem. But there are quite a few instructions that would benefit from better pictures, or better yet, a YouTube video! Jun 03, Constance Bodensee rated it really liked it. I enjoyed this book. I've listened to his podcast on the history of cooking and this book was in the same vein.

I enjoyed little tidbits of historical recipes mixed in with food lore. A fun and easy read. Dec 27, Margaret Heller rated it really liked it Shelves: Got this as a Christmas present and read it today. This hearkens back to a pre-scientific era of cooking, in which every house and inn had its own style of ale and pies and bread and so forth. It's cooking without recipes, baking with dough that "feels right" rather than relying on particular quantities of ingredients.

As such, this will probably look overwhelming to people who aren't used to baking or cooking. But it's also exciting. It's about trying lots of stuff, failing a lot, and not getti Got this as a Christmas present and read it today. It's about trying lots of stuff, failing a lot, and not getting the exact same thing twice. Though I suppose if you record everything you will find the combinations that worked the best for you, and then pass those along as recipes! This does, of course, require an extremely liberal attitude to food saftey. I don't think the USDA would be ok with the pickling reccommendations.

I tend to feel that pasteurization was actually a pretty good innovation, so I'll stick with it. I also don't anticipte seasoning my cast iron skillet by rendering bear fat. Your mileage may vary. Feb 18, Mandie Kok rated it liked it. The funny introduction makes it clear that this book isn't for everyone.

The Lost Art of Real Cooking by Ken Albala, Rosanna Nafziger Henderson | exuxasoheh.tk

It's the hard way to cook, but the rewards, the reader is assured, are worth it. I am not entirely convinced. Growing up in rural South Africa, I have certainly been exposed to many of the techniques in the book, including smoking and drying my own meats and fish. Cooking over hot coals is a cultural tradition that I fully embrace and engage in as often as possible.

So it's not the work or time involved that put me off the The funny introduction makes it clear that this book isn't for everyone.

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So it's not the work or time involved that put me off the recipes in the book. It's the recipes themselves. I love trying out new and interesting flavours and ingredients. Most of the recipes here are old fashioned foods that didn't particularly excite me, I'm afraid.

Rediscovering the Pleasures of Traditional Food One Recipe at a Time

Have a look at the index to see how many recipes grab your interest before you buy this book. It's certainly an interesting read with many useful techniques listed. Not suited to the beginner who would like more detailed instructions. Dec 28, Lisa Kelsey rated it liked it.


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I think I read "scrape off the layer of mold that forms" or some variation of that line a little too often for my food safety comfort level, so I don't know how many recipes from this book that I will actually try. However, I am definitely holding on to this book just in case there is some kind of apocalypse.

It's good to know how to make these things--especially how to make your own beer and cheese!